A resource for all military kids

  • by Cru Military
Photo by The National Guard/Flickr.

Military brat.

These are words of honor, not disrespect.

I grew up in a military family. Our frequent moves were normal for us kids. Didn’t everyone move every year or two? Dad was occasionally gone on TDY. Didn’t everyone’s parent leave for extended trips?

My dad did not serve in a combat zone, but today many military kids do have a mom or dad (and sometimes both) go away for one or more deployments.

The issues and fears these children face are unique. Some of them are part of a military family and are located on or near a military base. The children’s friends are often in the same situation and speak the same military-kid-speak language.

But many of our deployed personnel are National Guard or Reservists, and their families, are frequently located far from a military support system. They are civilians with a military parent, and their friends and neighbors may not have any understanding or concept of what unique stresses the family is facing.

For any child with a deployed parent, our new book, “Quest” will help these children learn how to trust God with their fears and concerns. Each day of this 30-day devotional features a keyword, arranged alphabetically, taken from Psalm 145.

They will learn the meaning of that word, how to pray about what they’ve learned and have space to write their own thoughts. Just as their parent is on a journey to a far land, the children are on a journey with God, a quest to discover how much He loves them.

Children will be greatly helped especially when their home-based parent goes through the Quest with them. They will be encouraged to talk about their fears or questions. They will learn that God is big enough to hold them close, and loving enough to handle their fears.

“Quest” was written from personal experience by two military moms, Bea Fishback and Liz Tyrrell. It can be ordered now from our Resource Store.

PS: Military parents sometimes don’t realize the unique position their children are in. A documentary produced in 2006, “Brats: Our Journey Home,” presents the world and perspective of the military kid. I recommend it strongly to military parents and to now-adult military kids.