Why College Students Are Strategic

10 reasons why college students can help fulfill the Great Commission.

Photo by Ted Wilcox

Teachable

They ask questions. They consume information on a rapid level and can put an idea into action with proper motivation. New challenges tend to provoke new curiosity or heart openness concerning personal purpose, convictions and life goals.

Starting Fresh

They are setting a new life trajectory. The decisions made, the habits formed, and the friendships forged during the college years tend to set the course for a lifetime.

Leading

They are the educated elite that will most likely lead in every domain of society -- government, religion, military, education, even sports and entertainment. Our future leaders will be people who went to college.

Unfettered

They are free to take incredible risks. They are unfettered by commitments, mortgages, career ladders and kids. They are free to go anywhere the Lord leads.

Growing

They form a large presence. The number of college students in the world has increased from about 60 million to about 130 million in the past decade.

Seeking Identity

They desire significance. College students want to feel part of something bigger. They want their life to count for something and they want a cause to live for.

Global

They are connected to a global student culture. Facebook, Myspace, Twitter and similar online social networks enable students to be accessible to their peers -- anywhere, anytime.

Innovative

The revolution of digital information has radically changed how people learn. The average student is online 3 and a half hours per day. Paper books and printed Bible studies have given way to podcasts, short films, text messages and chat forums.

Integrated

They fuse with society. Students don't congregate on the campus but spill over into coffee shops, Internet bars and along the city center. Increasingly, they don't even live on campus because there aren't enough dorm spaces. They're out in the city.

Active

Students are constantly searching for new ways to get involved with student culture and find a niche. They try many things and are exposed to new organizations, clubs, social groups, classes and professors every semester.